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unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
. on the campaign trail we heard governor romney say he supported a green card to the every math and science graduate from our university. why should we educate some of the best minds on earth and say sorry, no room in the u.s. economy for you? it makes no sense. they go away and compete against us rather than innovating and creating jobs here. then i took a closer look at what the republicans are actually proposing. they haven't turned the corner at all. in fact, they haven't even stepped out of their houses. they certainly didn't learn anything from the last election. the stem visa bill on the house floor this week was actually voted down in september. it was introduced with a few changes and no consultation with democrats. i want to find a bipartisan solution on immigration. i'm committed to it. i know it won't be easy. they say a journey of 1,000 miles begins with just one step. the problem is my colleagues on the other side of the aisle want to take one step and have the democrats travel the other 999.9 miles. certainly this bill isn't even a step it's a shell game. it's the same proble
? >> thanks, jess. >>> learning what science tastes like. >> chemistry in the kitchen, you bet. cool schools is coming up next. >>> howard here with your weather first. you'll need the heavy coats. down to the 20s in a few spots. it will be a sharply colder day, sunny with a few afternoon clouds here and there. lunch time temperature of 43. we'll only top out in the mid- 40s. i'll be back with a warmer weekend forecast in just a few minutes. >>> owward on the northbound side of 395, we've been telling you about an accident sitting on the shoulder north of duke street but before seminary road. more equipment has arrived on the scene. now original the two left lanes get through. expect delays as you come up from springfield. coming up in my next report, i'll also explain a situation going on in bethesda on the beltway at 6:18. back to you guys. >>> thursday morning cool schools time is here. we this morning are learning what science tastes like. the students in d.c. did their lab work on location. they went to a place where molecules and a master chef made for a tasty lesson. >> reporter: love
is what about the science shows it is. but he's doing this interesting thing where he's claiming to say the same thing that obama said about this. what obama was asked about was how do you explain to your daughters that you know, you're a christian. christianity said it took six days for the earth to be created. how do you explain that to your daughters. obama went on a theological question, we don't know how long six days is. i believe in the science obama has said millions of times, we should teach geology and evolution in science class and if you want to teach intelligent design and other theories, do it in religion class. and the important part with rubio is while he does seem to be tempering his first line now with mike allen yesterday after he got a lot of criticism for it he still believes fundamentally that you should teach creationism alongside evolution in classes. that's really where this comes from. his history when he was in florida as a state house speaker was a huge fight over evolution education in
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with 25 days left until the year-end fiscal cliff, and just 19 days until christmas, president obama warned lawmakers today not to add to the holiday pressures americans already feel, by letting the political stalemate drag on. but he also again insisted there would be no deal unless tax rates went up on the wealthy. >> the closer it gets to the brink, the more stressed we're going to be. >> woodruff: president obama made the short trip to northern virginia today to underline his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. at the home of what the white house called a typical middle class family, mr. obama said he's optimistic that agreement can be reached, but again drew a hard line for republicans in congress. >> everybody's is going to have
out? a new report by the national academy of science says the agency has no solid plan for the future. that report blames the president for the lack of direction, but it goes on to say nasa has not done enough to accomplish the obama administration's goal of sending astronauts to an astroid. a former nasa scientist says he's never seen the agency so utterly unfocused. >>> the holidays are finally here and one of the fixtures of the season happens tomorrow night. erica grow with a preview of the lighting of the national christmas tree. >> the first lady and tree will be where? >> reporter: the national park foundation is ready to give you a tree lighting ceremony you won't soon forget. the national tree is brand-new just planted in october and it's been prepped for tomorrow's spectacular display from top to bottom. >> we work on it all year long and now is crunch time. this is the 90th anniversary of the tree lighting. we'll have over 20,000 people here tomorrow night watching a live show. >> and the first lady of the united states of america. >> reporter: the stage is set for a spec
one after another individuals cross receiving their masters and doctorate degrees in science, in math, engineering. the amazing thing is one after another had names that were almost imupon to pronounce -- impossible to pronounce in some cases, and clearly the majority of these engineers and scientists were going -- came from other countries and were being told they must return to them. he made the statement in his op-ed that in fact at the end rather than just a diploma, they should be given a diploma and green card. mr. speaker, i agree with thomas friedman on this subject. for each person we welcome to america with one of these high degrees, we create jobs, net jobs. we create opportunity for expansion of the kinds of businesses that, in fact, americans are prepared to work in, but often we do not have enough engineers, scientists, or math professionals. this shortage, particularly at the masters and doctorate level, is well documented. this is not something in which republicans and democrats are on different sides. this is something which we agree to it. there is some controversy,
of good economic science out today like consumer confidence is up, the housing market is recovering,. >> exactly. >> jennifer: and u.s. corporate profits are at the highest they have been in u.s. history for the third quarter. in u.s. history. >> yes. yes. >> jennifer: all right, so where are the jobs? if the profits are the highest they have been in u.s. history where are the jobs? >> unfortunately, part of the reason that the profits are high, part of it, is that with demand coming back slowly, companies have been able to meet the demand, increase the production with not a lot of additional employment. or with a lot of temporary employment. [speaking at the same time] >> or employment that isn't that expensive to pay for. so basically, they can make profits because they are selling, their prices of what production, their cost of production are not rising as rapidly and therefore they have profits. >> jennifer: so what is going to happen to cause them to reinvest? >> well, i think what we are seeing now is as t
explanation in at this point to show you what happens when the social sciences and the humanities collide, you get total confusion here. because we had gordon melton here talking about what do we do with this sect/cult typology due to susanna's good question about christianity we tried to use that typology to describe the development of christianity and how it could have gone through all of our various stages. but here we have a believer and we always go to believers who has trouble would have trouble with any of that. wants to make a whole new category do i hear that a religion can simply be a brand new revelation with absolutely no connection whatsoever culturally to anything that came before it. and what could be the response to that? that's the entitlement of the person who is the believer but - let me get your comments. >> he did make reference a bit to the islam thing. he explained it very well. i had no idea what the bahai was. i had them confused with - well somebody said well whatever it is it's a pretty building go see it. that's all i've ever heard about it until today really. >> ye
science and conservation biology at ucla so hopefully there is some input i can put in the subject. what i want to focus on is the aspect of stewardship in this issue. ecosystems are a very fragile organism. ze you can say, and there are organisms involved in it. tampering with even the smallest piece of that could have dire consequences. and as we can see with the gulf folks they have tampered with the ecosystem. the frog eggs as they have moved from the original location. something as simple as that could cause awful things to happen to the ecosystem. and if these gulf folks are so free to even tamper with that, then who knows what could come next. it's not out of their character to try to evade the process of ceqa. that is what they are trying to do right now. what we can hope to do is stop them from getting away with this so that hopefully other institutions similar to them will not be able to do this very same thing in the future. thank you. >> next speaker. >>> hi, i'm virginia marshall from the sequoia audubon society and we do also support this resolution for reasons that have bee
. that in a report in the journal "science." we asked ben tracey and our los angeles bureau to tell us what that will mean to the rise of the seas. >> reporter: the researchers, including nasa scientists, say antarctica and greenland have lost nearly five trillion tons of ice since 1992, causing sea levels to rise by nearly half an inch. >> we didn't really know that we were going to find such a dramatic speed-up. >> reporter: nasa's erik ivins worked on the study. scientists say human activity, such as burning fossil fuels, is warming the atmosphere. >> each year, we're getting longer and longer melt seasons. this year, we had one of the longest melt seasons that we've ever seen. >> reporter: melting ice sheets now account for 30% of the rise in ocean levels, making flooding from storms such as hurricane sandy even more destructive. along the california coast, the ocean is expected to rise another three to five feet by the end of the century. 3.5 million confidential californians live within three feet of sea level. >> eventually, we will be consumed by higher elevation of the ocean. >> re
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ >> greg: last week, i went on a tour to promote my book "the joy of hate" which took me from florida, to alabama, and georgia. to tennessee. some call this the south with sarcasm. a buddy of mine gave me flick "deliverance" to watch as a joke. but i freaked out, large crowds with mom for daughters and sons for dads. dads for daughters. so many brought food from pumpkin bread to moonshine. that nearly killed me. more unicorns to shake a horn at. each place i went fan of the five turned on by a parent or their child. this was shared activity, the "the five," "red eye requests ants fnc, key place for families to commiserate. most is over their hatred of jasper. that makes them intelligent. but something is going on here. you fair food and everything. a stranger offered to take our orders and never heard or seen from again. new yorkers will mock this. the stupid rubs. but this is the only culture we have left as we barrel down identity politics and victim measure victor. only place left that everyone is the same is here. as
they are breaking up families. the republicans are trying to promote for science, technology and engineering and math, whether it's a high skilled visa or a low skilled advice a whether it's farm workers, domestic workers who clean hotepal this is all immigrant labor, and this apalo has an economic component in addition to the fact that many of their churches are telling them we can no longer side with this anti-immigration position. so it is changing out from under them and i think they are going to look for a way that they can change policy without a political backlash. joons we will be talking more about the upcoming elections a little bit later in the hour. a.b. stoddard, thank you. >> thank you. jenna: serious new concerns about a deteriorating situation in syria. why turkey says the bashar al-assad regime may be coming for it next and what our nato ally says it needs to protect its own people. we have a live report just ahead. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy d
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ you can stay in and like something... ♪ [ car alarm deactivates ] ♪ ...or you can get out there with your family and actually like something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. ois bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior, stop taking
of that deal are not mysterious. i don't think this involves rocket science in putting it together. it requires political consensus. i think there are a lot of trial balloons going on on the republican side of the aisle to try to build that consensus, and i think once that happens we're going to get it done. if we have to be here christmas week in order to protect the american public from the fiscal cliff, i'm happy to be here, and so are my colleagues. >> i hope everybody speaks greek because that would be the appropriate language to use the week after christmas. thank you. get it done before christmas. thank you, u.s. congressman lee terry, thank you so much for coming. >>> up next, president obama had mitt romney over for lunch at the white house. do you believe it? i'd love to know what happened in that room. it's the latest edition in the often frosty relationship between the presidential rivals. it was pretty warm for about an hour on election night. this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> well, this next story should surprise no one. the 112th congress is on track to be the least
creation bill. it provides green cards for 55,000 immigrants with advanced degrees in the sciences. but it also allows the recipient's families to join them and attempt to end the brain drain that hampers the high-tech industry. >> it makes no sense to educate people, bright, talented people and then frankly deport them so they can compete against the united states. >> but the bill infure rated many democrats. it ends the green card lottery that randomly picks 55,000 immigrants regardless of education from countries with low immigration rate. >> that just shows the colleagues still haven't gotten it from the recent election. >> when you have control of the house, senate and white house you did not pass immigration reform. let's stop treating this like a political football. >> republicans were infuriated orve this remark from hank johnson from georgia. >> i don't know what is in the head of those who supporting this bill. but if it's not racist in its intent, it certainly racist in its effect. >> i'm personally insulted that anyone would use even loosely the term of "racism" as part
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> you're watching cnbc's "squawk on the street" live from the financial capital of the world. the opening bell set to ring in just under two minutes or so. if you want to play the history game looking at the history of the month of december for the markets, some call it meaningless but it is basically the second best month of the year after april. 23 of the past 28 decembers have been up. average of 1.5%. since '90, up 2%. not an insignificant -- santa claus is for real many times. >> many of us have to commit. we're not allowed to own individual stocks but it's uniform gift to minors time. you have to make a contribution. i don't know whether you guys do it. it's a great way to put money away for your kids. that contribution is due now. there are a lot of contributions that are due that you remember to put money to work. in an environment where not people put money to work and people aren't doing anything, you get an influx of retail money. you have to co
by the national academy of sciences. the report blames the president for a lack of direction. it also says nasa has not done enough to accomplish the obama administration's goal of sending astronauts to an asteroid. >>> the first female submariners in the u.s. navy have earned their dolphin. the dolphin pins awarded wednesday signify a woman's status as fully qualified submarine officers. they underwent a year of training followed by a year at sea to reach the milestone. >>> what was planned as a birthday party for jazz legend dave brubeck is now becoming a memorial tribute. >> he died just one day shy ever his 92nd birthday. his passion reached so far, it influenced the causes of civil rights and the thawing of the cold war. >> reporter: dave brubeck was a jazz pioneer whose career spanned eight decades. a classically trained pianist and composer formed his first band in 1951. eight years later the album "time-out." made his name a household name. it included a composition his saxophonist paul desmond wrote. "take five" with its catchy rhythms and unusual beat became brubeck's signature. it wa
tara wall was a senior media adviser for. an associate professor of science at columbia university. a fellow at the roosevelt institute and manuel reyes. thanks for having you here. it's nice to have you. >>> tara, welcome to nerdland. >> how did i know you were coming to me first. >> now i would like you to explain your party. >> lay it all on the table. >> in a certain way, it's so early, i feel silly talking about it. but i do think it's important that we not sort of come out of a win as i've seen both parties do in midterm elections or general elections with this narrative, oh, the other party is over. this is the decisive election. i don't think we see anything like that. when you look at the new herd, what seems to you like the things that are different? >> i think, number one, there are a couple of things. i think as you mentioned, it is a little more diverse, both ethnically and sexwise. i mean, you have a few more women which i think is great. i think after any election, everybody does recalibrating and lessons learned. i think what you don't want to lose sight of is the f
happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. >>> joining me for today's strategy session, paul begala along with cnn contributor erick erickson, editor and chief of the conservative political blog redstate.com. president obama went today to pennsylvania to a toy store, part of his p.r. strategy to try to sell his plans on the fiscal cliff. now, we know this works well for him in politics. he's won two elections obviously. but the question really i think today is whether this very same kind of thing is as effective when the president is pushing a policy issue. and i suppose, paul, i just ought to start with you in that. >> oh, i think it is, joe. first off, the president, yes, he served in the senate for like five minutes, but he's not a creature of wa
realistic about the science. we have to start preparing for climate adaptation in addition to coming together and getting a federal strategy on ardsing greenhouse gas emissions from our energy. >> bill: amen to that. if not now, when? and how much longer are we going to wait? we will get into that issue with tyson slocumb. tom hankins from iowa will be joining us in the next hour and dylan byers, media reporter for politico will be along as well. busy, busy morning here on the full court press. we love it that way. but first. >> this is -- >> dan? what do you got. >> other headlines making news on this friday. the man who got mitt romney's presidential campaign logo tatooed on his face is now having regrets. politico reports -- >> now he has regrets. getting a face tatoo? okay. >> eric heartsburg wants the tatoo removed because he says romney, who he enthusiastically supported is shameful and has no dignity. heartsburg says romney is a sore lose loser. >> who is he accusing someone of having no dignity. >> i think that's how every romney supporter feels.
that the science is unequivocal on this. that repeated hits to the head. not just concussions by the way but routine hits to the head that football players take often lead far more than in the general lop legs lead to depression, the early on set of ghen sharks alzheimer's and even lou gehrig's disease there no question about that who would deny that it's the roughest game in the world maybe with the exception of rugby and if you are going to play it it, you are taking a bodily risk. everyone knows that. >> absolutely. >> you are richly rewarded if you succeed. and then there are guys like my friend frank gifford who played many many years, got a bunch of concussions but, you know, he is now an elderly man but is he still in good shape. so it's not a cause and effect, this is absolutely going to happen. but the culture of pro-football now is so intense and these guys take a lot of substance, whether they admit it or not, painkillers, just to build your body up and all of that. that i'm just wondering whether this is a really now off the chart high risk group for the madness exon inept. >
has fallen dramatically. there is no scientific relation in social science between the number of guns and the homicide rate. we've seen, there is just -- >> what a load of absolute -- >> -- virginia has gone up dramatically. >> what a load of claptrap. >> we have to be clear about this. he's talking about virginia. the death rate in virginia has gone up and i think people don't understand all that. in the united states, we have some agreement on what we can do and i think we need to talk about that. there's some new polling by mayors against illegal guns that show that huge majorities of gun owners and americans believe that we should have background checks on all gun sales and let me tell you, states that do that save lives. and we need to do the things i think that are possible, the things that are going to make a big difference. we know that in america, if we do things like background checks on things like better tools for psychiatrists, we can stop these killings. not all of them, because countries in europe that have these types of things, countries around the world and states th
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> i think we'll take it one step at a time. we'll sort of get over the marriage thing first, then look at kids but obviously we want a family so we have to start thinking about that. >> prince william and the then kate middleton before their wedding talking about their plans to start a family one day. well, that day has apparently arrived. katie nicholl is the author of "william and harry behind the palace walls "and is here to talk about today's breaking royal baby news. >> it's finally happened. the truth is ever since you and i were there on that wedding day reporting from buckingham palace, everyone has been on royal baby bump watch, and every time the duchess of cambridge has stepped out perhaps looking a little fuller in the face, a little rounder on her tummy, that rumor mill has just gone into overdrive. is she pregnant. well, yes, today we can reveal and confirm that she is indeed pregnant, which is wonderful and very joyful news, both herself, prince william an
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. rich, chewy caramel rolled up in smooth milk chocolate. don't forget about that payroll meeting. rolo.get your smooth on. also in minis. at cepacol we've heard people are going to extremes to relieve their sore throats. oh, okay, you don't need to do that. but i don't want any more of the usual lozenges and i want new cooling relief! ugh. how do you feel? now i'm cold. hmm. this is a better choice. new cepacol sensations cools instantly, and has an active ingredient that stays with you long after the lozenge is gone. ahhh. not just a sensation sensational relief. [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's "the stephanie miller show"." [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> stephanie: yahoo, it is "the stephanie miller show." happy friday six minutes after the hour, 1-800-steph-12 the phone number, www. www.stephaniemiller.com the website. and speaking of sexy liberal. [ ♪ music ♪ ] yeah yeah. ♪ fug
an impact on brain function. as science and medicine progressed, society has come to understand mental illness with clarity. senator conrad and crapo wanted to strike the word lunatic from the united states code. i thank them for their effort and i encourage my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill to modernize or codified law to reflect the 21st century understanding of mental illness. and i reserve the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: this bill eliminates outdated references in the u.s. code that stigmatize individuals with mental illness. this legislation easily passed the senate with strong bipartisan support. the bill eliminates the word lunatic from the -- several sections of the united states code in order for our code to reflect meanings which are much more appropriate and up to date in the 21st century. in the past members of congress on both sides of the aisle have worked
upon restrictions not supported by sound science. so now i'm going to tell you about some problems i have with russia even though i want russia to be in the w.t.o. and i want this legislation to pass so it can be fully implemented. now i would say some things that we have problems. let's take pork exports as an example. in 2008, u.s. pork sales to russia totaled over 200,000 metric tons, and since that time, exports have fallen nearly 60% due to russia's reduced import quotas and questionable sanitary and phyto sanitary restrictions. i'm pleased our trade negotiators were able to negotiate a satisfactory trade rate quota for our pork, but this administration under president obama has fallen short in its obligation to stand up with u.s. farmers on these sanitary and phyto-sanitary standards. in other words, using sound science instead of some i illegitimate reason for keeping our products out of russia. i have communicated time and again what i expected of this administration because they have to negotiate for us. in june 2011, i led a bipartisan letter with senators nelson and 26 oth
the training and education of science technology, engineering, and math. this is what this legislation is about. we want america to be the magnet for the best minds. we want them to come here, get educated, and stay here to improve our lives and turn it into a reality right here in america so that america continues to be the land of opportunity for all. >> today we put another down payment on jobs and job creation. for each of these visas that are granted, it is estimated that there'll be three additional u.s. jobs created. for each of these individuals who apply, they will look at who the student population is in the united states working on masters and phd's and stem areas. this of be at a diverse population. this cause us to see this as an improvement in diversity outreach. almost anyone who attends a graduation at the masters and phd level, you will see those crossing the line coming from all over the world and in all colors and sizes. that is why we did this today. we want this to be one that says, who wants to come to be america and has a likelihood of success in creating success for all
of roseman university of health and sciences. in 1999 dr. rosenburg rented a small office space in henderson, nevada, believing he could establish a pharmacy school that would produce highly-skilled graduates ready to be recruited for work across the country. his innovative approach to education led him to develop a block format curriculum that emphasizes a student-centered active learning environment, allowing students to participate in experiencal education from the very beginning of their studies and complete their doctor al degree in just three years instead of the traditional four. making roseman one of the most affordable pharmacy schools in the nation. during his tenure, dr. rosenburg helped transform roseman of a local school of 38 students to a regional institution with over 1,000 and offering an array of quality programs in nursing, dentistry and business administration. mr. heck: as he prepared for retirement, i commend dr. rosenburg for his vision, innovation and commitment to offering students an affordable, state-of-the-art education that has and will benefit the state of nevad
december 10th and 22nd claiming for science and research. and new jersey governor chris chr tooe. the two showed a unified front in the wake of the storm. and the royal baby watch, it is on. there you see a pregnant and smiling catherine, duchess of cambridge. she was in for acute morning sickness. prince charles says he is thrilled he's going to become a grandfather. and the baby will be the next in line to the throne after prince william and actually after prince charles as well. so there's a little bit of a line there. >> rather it's a boy or girl. >> i think it's exciting. i don't think there's anybody out there they've been waiting and hoping and now we've seen she's pregnant and with child. >> catherine and no more kate. >> she's the duchess now. >> thank you. >>> one of the most conservative members of the united states senate, i think it's fair to say he shocked washington today, the tea party favorite senator jim demint of south carolina, he's standing by live. he's here in "the situation room." he's getting ready to explain why he's resigning from the senate less than halfway th
, the bringing in a science and technology. you are a world bank guy. you went to harvard and dell was science and technology. here we are was tremendous knowledge in these fields. we talk about helping democracies. how do you see that from not only indicating these villages but scholarships and others, whether it is the french, the canadians, the brits, so that there are always for educational, the empowerment of women come are raising their status, inclusion. the american bar society and all those groups. what do you think about that? is it such that unless you have big muscular defense, big muscular foreign aid? i don't think america will ever be a wimp in anything, but i have an additional school of thought. what do you think? what could help that in america? >> thank you. generally, to speak a very frankly and what you have requested, the support of law enforcement in colombia has been helpful. that is a first step. as you said coming in several points to develop. increasing security capabilities and increasing the state's capability to promote human rights. in a case like ours, we have h
. bowles from yesterday talking about it at the christian science monitor breakfast, all of our "washington journal" segments -- you confined all the video there. c-span.org. democrat line. caller: a couple questions. if you increase the taxes for the very wealthy -- and food for thought, why has there not been a lot of growth? it has been regressed -- reduced for several years. what are we in the shape -- if we have had the tax cuts and have not created a lot of infrastructure, that argument does not stand with me. it is a philosophy that has happened over the past 20 years. a big difference between the stock owned companies, their top executives' salaries versus the bottom person on the latter, those companies, such a big gap. is that kind of where our country is heading, the big gap in the glasses? guest: -- classes? guest: i think the caller's comments isolate and the difficulty about the tax rates. the internet bubble in the 1990's, 9/11, all of these things happen when you raise or lower tax rates and it is hard to determine how to isolate the impact of just the tax rates. host: right
a speech in which he says he wants to use the tax hike to invest in training, education, science and research. when you're in a deep, deep hole, you're borrowing almost 40 cents of every dollar you spend, shouldn't you constrain yourself and not start new programs? or if you start a new needed program, shouldn't you reduce some less valuable program to pay for it instead of just taxing to create more programs? so not once in the speech did he discuss entitlements. it's the largest item in our government, entitlements. not once did the president of the united states discuss with the american people the problem of social security, medicare, medicaid are on an unsustainable path and are at great risk. shouldn't the president honestly talk to the american people about that? he didn't discuss our $16 trillion debt and how the debt commission that he appointed indicates that we're on an unsustainable path heading to a fiscal crisis. he did not discuss that. or the economic catastrophe that could occur if we don't get off this unsustainable path. the president should lead on these thing
from mars but in reality once we decide what we're going to do we have a science operational working group. we decide what we're going to do and the sol is a martian day. we write the script. we program -- we write the program. that takes about six hours to write. and then it gets sent from the deep space network to mars where the rover picks it up and the rover does all of those operations during that day. it gets that information first thing in the morning and then it is with us all day long. you program an entire day in one sitting. >> i love that name. did you say deep mars network? >> deep space. reporting live from the deep space network. so that's interesting. why do a whole day's worth of instructions at one time? is it more efficient form the machine? does it -- >> there's always this 20-minute light delay. in writing the program writing the scripts it's called, takes a little bit of time to do. we have to get together and review things. doing it in real time is inefficient. the way the rover wo
. caller: c-span could put on actual science. i think there is a lot of magical thinking on the part of democrats here. first of all, they are assuming if they raise the taxes on this one%, it will not affect the jobs and the companies that they work for. nor would it affect the customers they have. what are the percentages of the most important job creators around? how did you identify them? they had no clue. i think the other aspect of magical thinking is that in the noise and the signal, nate silver pointed out previously a 12% rise in gdp might ake for a 2% rise in employment. in 2005, we got 3.5 million jobs lost. it is a fantasy to believe that the president's spending is going to make employment rise more. recently, there has been an article by a harvard university law professor who says if you are going to do this thing, it is more important to make all the fiscal cuts them back as greece and spain know, when people do not trust your debt, weak issue too much debt. if everyone heads to the door like china and other is, our debt is really going to go up. host: should the raisi
is the telecommunications industry. one of the reasons as a computer science major i would argue, one of the reasons that the telecommunications, technology industry has been so successful, is because the government hasn't figured out how to regulate it and slow it down. yet here you have a proposal by the united nations coming out of the united nations to interfere with that multistakeholder organization that's been and allowed this industry to be so successful and allowed the internet to shape and dramatically improve so many people's lives. so many of the things that we can do today and all the conveniences that have been added through great new apps and technology have come from this multistakeholder governance of the internet. yet here you have the united nations trying to step in and let's be real clear about who some of these countries are that want to do this and what they are intending to do if they were to be successful. countries like russia and china are leading this. some of the arab nations right now, where you see uprisings, many of those uprisings have been brought through social med
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than antelope with night-vision goggles. nice! get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. >> republicans have said that they don't like those reforms. they like to do more. and if that's true, then they should tell us what they would like an an alternative or as a compliment to those. if they would to build on those, they can tell us how. but we can't react until we see the details of a proposal. we need it on the rates and revenue side as well as on the spending side. we've given them our best deal, what makes sense for the country. >
quite a successful science company in our state for over 200 years. we have cars. we built a lot of cars over the years, g.m. and chrysler products. over half of the new york stock exchange, half the fortune 500, being credit card business in our state. the coast of our state is the site of the nation's summer capital, rehoboth beach and a bunch of other places. the letter "c" has been pretty big. people say why do they call you the first state? we're the first colony that threw off the yoke of the british tyranny and at the same time said pennsylvania take a hike, we want to be a state on our own. 225 years from tomorrow to be exact, the first state to ratify the constitution. but we have the best beaches in the country. last year i think there were four or five-star beaches in america, two in delaware. rehoboth and dewey. the best air force base in the world. we have, i think, the finest judiciary, finest judicial system in the state. we have the best financial controls and financial controls and cash management system. we have a triple-a credit rate system. we continue to have that ki
sister in the seventh grade had a friend of mine as her science teacher, my mom took my yearbook down, took a picture of his picture, xeroxed it, put it in a frame from senior year and gave it to him in this beautiful frame. it was psonalized and he loved it. but if you have multiple teachers, you don't have to give all those teachers a gift. >> yeah. makes sense. >> if you have an assistant, what factors do you think about when you're talking about a tip? >> well, that really depends on your position in the company and how long that assistant has been with you. now, if it were up to me and i wanted to make sure those calls were screened properly, i would bump that up. >> doormen, do you give to all of the doormen? sometimes you live in a big building there's 10 or 15. >> most of us live in doormen-staffed building. if you don't want to necessarily play favorites, but at the same time, you know, if someone's been helpful or more helpful than others, you might want to give them a gift. also, these buildings have pools. so you could pool together, you know, your money. it's anonymous, t
about this. in political science, if you look at the way house majority participate, it tells us about the way the senate majority is trying to behave today. they try to structure the environment so they can win, and they do so, but controlling the agenda at preventing the minority from participating in the process. that is not a surprise to anyone. that is what is being done in the seventh, and that is not how the senate has traditionally been run. there is a number of tools they have at their disposal to do this. the first one is filing closure. filing culture is something that is done out of weakness on the majority party -- prepared is a tool for the majority provide certainty in the process, provides a symbolic gesture on their part to create a demarcation that is clear. it is the only way in the senate you can do those things. in the house to conduct with a closed rule. more egregiously cannot we have this thing called same day cloture, where the idea is the bill is on the floor, the party filibusters' it for a while, and then the and ciardi, it's down and says which cannot get a
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